Tuesday

The Best Whole Chicken Recipe for the Crockpot {Plus Bone Broth the Easy Peasy Way}



This recipe is so effortless you won't even believe how delicious it is. Our family (every last one of those precious people) LOVE this meal. Not only do I love how it tastes, but I also love that it's an economical way to feed my family healthy food.


I paid $17 for a whole chicken and that, along with onions, carrots and potatoes was enough for two meals for a family of six. (Our youngest is two and he loves this meal, but obviously he didn't eat as much as the rest of us.) I figure that by the time I add in the onions, carrots and potatoes it might have cost $23 for the entire meal but that still works out to just under $2 per person per meal. That's a fantastic price for a whole food meal wouldn't you say?

Here's how to make this melt in your mouth whole chicken in crock pot:

Ingredients:

5-6 potatoes
2-3 onions
5-6 carrots
one whole chicken
2 sticks of real, organic butter

I know butter has gotten a bad name for itself over the last few years, but it's actually quite good for you. (Here's a great post to give you some information about the benefits of butter.)

Add the chicken to the crockpot first and then add the rest of the ingredients in around the chicken. Cook on high for about 6 hours. 

You will seriously have the most amazing, moist chicken you have ever had! And for bonus benefits, after you've served the meal, remove any remaining chicken from the bones. Don't throw any of those bones away because you are going to make easy peasy bone broth which is so much cheaper than store-bought broth and its health benefits far surpass the carton kind.

Here's what you do:

Add all of the bones back into the crock pot. There will already be liquid in there from the butter and moisture from cooking your meal in a crock pot. Don't throw that out because you will want to use that. Fill the rest of your crockpot up with water leaving about 1/2" head space from the top. 

Set your crockpot on low for a long time. (The highest mine will go is 20 hours). Sometimes I cook it even longer than that and just add a little more water to compensate for evaporation. The longer you do it, the more nutrients that will be extracted from the bones. 

After about 20-24 hours, you will need to strain the liquid so that the bones and other "stuff" that you don't want from the bird don't get into your broth. I strain it right into my freezer safe containers. Let them cool for a bit on the counter and then add to your freezer. You can use the bones 2-3 times but by the third time there won't be as much flavor. You can also add herbs and spices, little bits of celery, etc. to add even more flavor to each batch. Making broth this way is virtually free because you already paid for the chicken and bones.  

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